Ants are eusocial insects of the family Formicidae.  Ants evolved from vespoid wasp ancestors in the Cretaceous period. There are more than 13,800 described species and an estimate of 22,000 species. They are easily identified by their geniculate (elbowed) antennae and the distinctive node-like structure that forms their slender waists.

Ants form colonies that range in size from a few dozen predatory individuals living in small natural cavities to highly organised colonies that may occupy large territories and consist of millions of individuals. Larger colonies consist of various castes of sterile, wingless females, most of which are workers (ergates), as well as soldiers (dinergates) and other specialised groups. Nearly all ant colonies also have some fertile males called “drones” and one or more fertile females called “queens” (gynes). The colonies are described as superorganisms because the ants appear to operate as a unified entity, collectively working together to support the colony.

Ants can be found on every landmass on Earth except Antarctica and a few remote or inhospitable islands. Ants thrive in moist tropical ecosystems and may exceed the combined biomass of wild birds and mammals. Their success in so many environments has been attributed to their social organisation and their ability to modify habitats, tap resources, and defend themselves. Their long co-evolution with other species has led to mimetic, commensal, parasitic, and mutualistic relationships.

Ant societies have division of labour, communication between individuals, and an ability to solve complex problems. These parallels with human societies have long been an inspiration and subject of study. Many human cultures make use of ants in cuisine, medication, and rites. Some species are valued in their role as biological pest control agents. Their ability to exploit resources may bring ants into conflict with humans, however, as they can damage crops and invade buildings. Some species, such as the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta) of South America, are regarded as invasive species in other parts of the world, establishing themselves in areas where they have been introduced accidentally.

Source: Wikipedia

Subfamily Dolichoderinae

Tribe Dolichoderini

Dolichoderus indrapurensis
(Sarawak, Malaysia)
Dolichoderus indrapurensis (Tending treehopper nymphs)
(Sarawak, Malaysia)
Dolichoderus cuspidatus (Tending to aphids)
(Sarawak, Malaysia)
Dolichoderus thoracicus
(Sabah, Malaysia)

Subfamily Ectatomminae

Tribe Ectatommini

Stictoponera coxalis
(Singapore)
Stictoponera menadensis
(Sabah, Malaysia)

Subfamily Formicinae

Tribe Camponotini

Camponotus albosparsus
(Singapore)
Camponotus albosparsus (Tending to treehopper and nymph)
(Singapore)
Colobopsis explodens
(Sarawak, Malaysia)
Dinomyrmex gigas ssp. gigas (Singapore)
Dinomyrmex gigas ssp. gigas (With foraged dead butterfly carcass)
(Singapore)
Echinopla melanarctos
(Johore, Malaysia)
Polyrhachis abdominalis
(Singapore)
Polyrhachis armata
(Sarawak, Malaysia)
Polyrhachis furcata
(Khao Sok NP, Thailand)
Polyrhachis inermis
(Sabah, Malaysia)
Polyrhachis sp. 086A4877
(Singapore)

Tribe Oecophyllini

Oecophylla smaragdina (Tending to caterpillars)
(Singapore)
Oecophylla smaragdina (Queen esptablishing a new colony with new egg clutch)
(Singapore)
Oecophylla smaragdina (Swarm with Dinomyrmex gigas ssp. gigas prey)
(Sarawak, Malaysia)

Subfamily Myrmicinae

Tribe Crematogastrini

Calyptomyrmex sp. 086A7660
(Singapore)
Calyptomyrmex sp. 0F1A2235
(Singapore)
Carebara diversa
(Singapore)
Cataulacus horridus
(Johore, Malaysia)
Crematogaster inflata
(Johore, Malaysia)
Crematogaster sp. 0F1A6308
(Singapore)
Crematogaster sp. 0K0A0997
(Singapore)
Meranoplus bicolor
(Kaeng Krachan NP, Thailand)
Meranoplus sp. 0F1A9760
(Johore, Malaysia)
Meranoplus sp. 0F1A9938
(Johore, Malaysia)
Tetramorium sp. 0F1A7309
(Singapore)

Tribe Solenopsidini

Megalomyrmex leoninus
(Milpe, Ecuador)
Myrmicaria brunnea
(Sabah, Malaysia)

Subfamily Ponerinae

Tribe Platythyreini

Platythyrea parallela
(Singapore)

Tribe Ponerini

Diacamma geometrica
(Singapore)
Leptogenys sp. 0F1A7573
(Khao Sok NP, Thailand)
Leptogenys sp. 0F1A8104
(Sarawak, Malaysia)
Odontomachus ruficeps
(Singapore)
Pseudoneoponera tridentata
(Singapore)

Subfamily Proceratiinae

Tribe Proceratiini

Discothyrea sp. (Singapore)