Blattodea is an order of insects that contains cockroaches and termites. Termites were considered a separate order, Isoptera, but genetic and molecular evidence suggests termites evolved from within the cockroach lineage. For the purpose of categorization, I have chosen to keep cockroaches under Blattaria and termite under Isoptera.

Most people find it difficult to accept that termites are closely related to cockroaches, and think they are mostly related to ants due to their complex social structure and superficial appearance to ants. But when you look at a termite alate (winged termite swarmer), they do superficially look like cockroaches.

Cockroach nymph.
Termite alate after wings have fallen off.

In fact, termites and ants tend to be mutually exclusive in an area, and ants will try to eliminate termite colonies.

Termites and ants fighting over dominance of a rotten log.

Source: Wikipedia

Blattaria (Cockroaches) 

There are about 4600 cockroach species, and 30 species are associated with human habitats and considered pests. Cockroaches are an ancient group, originating some 300–350 million years ago, during the Carboniferous period. Cockroaches are generalist, lacking adaptative sucking mouthparts and have chewing mouthparts. Their wide ecological amplitude are associated to their tolerance to a myriad of climates, from Arctic cold to tropical heat and also able to adapt to a wide range of habitats.

Tropical cockroaches are often much larger than temperate species. Many people would not consider cockroaches social insects, but some species have an complex social structure involving common shelter, social dependence, information transfer and kin recognition.

Since early history, cockroaches have been popularly depicted as dirty pests, although most species are inoffensive and live in a wide range of habitats, with only a few species living up to their poor profile.

Source: Wikipedia

Family Anaplectidae

Subfamily Anaplectinae

Anaplecta vittata
(Singapore)
Anaplecta sp.
(Sarawak, Malaysia)
Anaplecta sp.
(Sarawak, Malaysia)

Family Blaberidae

Subfamily Epilamprinae

Rhicnoda sp. 0F1A0155
(Sabah, Malaysia)
Epilamprinae 086A43565
(Singapore)
Epilamprinae 086A6326
(Singapore)
Epilamprinae 086A6333
(Singapore)

Tribe Morphnini

Morphna dotata
(Singapore)
Pseudophoraspis sp. 0F1A3793
(Sabah, Malaysia)
Rhabdoblatta sp. 0F1A4786
(Sabah, Malaysia)
Rhabdoblatta sp. 0F1A6227
(Singapore)
Rhabdoblatta sp. 086A8165
(Singapore)

Subfamily Panesthiinae

Panesthia angustipennis ssp. angustipennis
(Sabah, Malaysia)
Panesthia sp. 0F1A4638
(Sabah, Malaysia)

Subfamily Paranauphoetinae

Paranauphoeta lyrata
(Sabah, Malaysia)

Subfamily Perisphaerinae

Perisphaerus sp. 086A9902
(Singapore)

Family Blattellidae

Hemithyrsocera vittata
(Kaeng Krachan NP, Thailand)

Family Blattidae

Subfamily Blattinae

Catara minor (female)
(Sabah, Malaysia)
Catara rugosicollis (Female)
(Sarawak, Malaysia)
Catara rugosicollis (Male)
(Sarawak, Malaysia)
Dorylaea atrocaput
(Sarawak, Malaysia)
Dorylaea heinzei (Adult)
(Singapore)
Dorylaea heinzei (Nymph)
(Singapore)
Protagonista pertristis (Adult)
(Singapore)
Protagonista pertristis (Nymph)
(Singapore)

Family Corydiidae

Subfamily Corydiinae

Ergaula capucina (Male)
(Kaeng Krachan NP, Thailand)
Ergaula pilosa (Female)
(Singapore)
Ergaula pilosa (Male) (Singapore)
Eucorydia forceps
(Kaeng Krachan NP, Thailand)

Family Ectobiidae

Sundablatta pulcherrima
(Sarawak, Malaysia)
Sundablatta sp. (Nymph) 0F1A9439
(Sarawak, Malaysia)
Sundablatta sp. (Nymph) 0F1A2917
(Johore, Malaysia)

Family Nyctiboridae

Megaloblatta longipennis
(Mindo, Ecuador)

Family Pseudophyllodromiidae

Balta notulata
(Singapore)
Prosoplecta sp. 0F1A5165
(Sarawak, Malaysia)
Pseudophyllodromia laticeps (Sabah, Malaysia)
Pseudophyllodromia laticeps
(Singapore)

Unidentified Blattaria

Blattaria 0F1A9002
(Akanin’ ny Nofy, Madagascar)
Blattaria 0F1A9448
(Andasibe, Madagascar)
Blattaria 0F1A8591
Sarawak, Malaysia)
Blattaria 0F1A9195
(Sarawak, Malaysia)
Blattaria 0F1AG. Mulu NP, Sarawak, Malaysia)
Blattaria 0F1A7448
(Sarawak, Malaysia)
Blattaria 0F1A2033
(Kaeng Krachan NP, Thailand)
Blattaria 0F1A3909
(Kaeng Krachan NP, Thailand)
Blattaria 0F1A1172
(Milpe, Ecuador)
Blattaria 0F1A0291
(Mindo, Ecuador)
Blattaria 0F1A1100
(Mindo, Ecuador)
Blattaria 0F1A2035
(Ranomafana, Madagascar)
Blattaria 0F1A6553
(Ranomafana, Madagascar)
Blattaria 0F1A0525
(Singapore)
Blattaria 0F1A0638
(Singapore)
Blattaria 0F1A2742
(Singapore)
Blattaria 0F1A2832
(Singapore)
Blattaria 0F1A9765
(Singapore)
Blattaria 0F1A4506
(Sumaco, Ecuador)
Blattaria 0F1A4811
(Sumaco, Ecuador)
Blattaria 0F1A5490
(Sumaco, Ecuador)
Blattaria 0F1A8924
(Sabah, Malaysia)
Blattaria 0F1A9452
(Sabah, Malaysia)
Blattaria 0F1A9494
(Sabah, Malaysia)
Blattaria 0F1A5704
(Sabah, Malaysia)
Blattaria 0F1A2967
(Johore, Malaysia)
Blattaria 0F1A3167
(Johore, Malaysia)
Blattaria 0F1A1415
(Johore, Malaysia)
Blattaria 086A0884
(Singapore)
Blattaria 086A4324
(Singapore)
Blattaria 0F1A1418
(Andasibe, Madagascar)

Isoptera (Termites)

Termites are among the most successful groups of insects, colonising most landmasses except Antarctica. Their colonies range in size from a few hundred individuals to enormous societies with several million individuals.

Like ants, bees and wasps from the order Hymenoptera, termites have complex social structures and are divide into sterile and fertile social groups. Sterile groups include “workers” and “soldier“, while all colonies have fertile males called “kings” and one or more fertile females called “queens”. Termites mostly feed on dead plant material and cellulose, generally in the form of wood, leaf litter, soil, or animal dung. Termites are major detritivores, particularly in the subtropical and tropical regions, and their recycling of wood and plant matter is of considerable ecological importance.

Termite queens are reportedly the longest known lifespan of any insect, with some queens living up to 30 to 50 years. Unlike ants, which undergo a complete metamorphosis, each individual termite goes through an incomplete metamorphosis that proceeds through egg, nymph, and adult stages. Some termites are able to digest wood, and process cellulose internally, while other species are not able to fully digest cellulose and farm fungus to partially break down wood before ingesting.

Termite colonies may be arboreal, mound-like or subterranean, with primitive termites nesting completely inside these enclosed structures such as stumps or logs. Nest construction material is made largely from the termites’ own faecal matter, other materials being chewed vegetable fibre, which makes a weak waterproof substance. Aerial nests are connected to the ground by enclosed passageways. The soft-bodied, blind workers of most species live permanently in their protected environments and do not venture into the open air.The nests are complex structures, and tunnels link them to the foraging areas. 

In Africa and Australia, termite mounds can be as large as nine meters tall and up to thirty meters in diameter, producing an area of increased fertility and creating a small hotspot for biodiversity.

Source: Wikipedia

Family Termitidae

Subfamily Macrotermitinae (Fungus Growing Termites)

Macrotermitinae 0F1A9368
(Khao Sok NP, Thailand)
Macrotermitinae 086A4010
(Singapore)
Macrotermitinae 086A6994
(Singapore)

Subfamily Nasutitermitinae (Nasute Termites)

Nasutitermitinae 086A8662
(Singapore)
Nasutitermitinae 086A1936
(Singapore)
Nasutitermitinae 086A3065
(Singapore)
Nasutitermitinae 086A7477
(Singapore)
Nasutitermitinae 086A4973
(Singapore)
Nasutitermitinae 086A7660
(Singapore)

Subfamily Termitinae

Termitinae 0F1A0267
(Singapore)
Termitinae 086A6461
(Singapore)